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Sectors

Aviation, Transporation and Infrastructure

CCS works with local and state governments and agencies and the private sector to maximize their investment in transit and infrastructure spaces.

Upgrading and rebuilding our transit, infrastructure, and airports require specialized expertise. We work directly with consultants, planners, architects, and engineers to make sure our transit, infrastructure, and airports clients get the very best results.

We support our clients with technical expertise and functions while assembling the right team for design and construction. We’re experts in validating the design and budget forecasting. We help transit, airport, and infrastructure clients get the most out of their investment dollars while ensuring projects stay on track to become operational on day one. Over the course of this work, CCS keeps stakeholders informed to demonstrate both ongoing and long-term value.

Highlights

  • 123 aviation projects with an estimated value 
of $4.7 billion

  • 155 transportation projects with an estimated value of $8.2 billion

  • 134 parking structures with an estimated value of $13.8 billion

Our process

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Expertise and optimization

CCS can support transportation and infrastructure departments with technical expertise and in assembling the right project team. We facilitate construction management and general contractor selection, identify the right subcontractors and consultants, utilizing deep knowledge of the local market through our own team of knowledgeable experts who are skilled in every facet of the design and construction process.

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Design and budget validation

Beginning with pre-design, CCS ensures that design for transportation, air, and infrastructure projects are future-proofed to meet the long-term goals of the agencies. Our collaborative method includes feasibility studies, design evaluation, review, construction management selection, and accurate total project budgeting.

We assist decision-makers with budget estimates and advise stakeholders on cost and constructability. We help determine the best method of project delivery, drawing on our deep familiarity with the costs, risks, timeline, and contractual aspects of the procurement process.

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Project phasing

Transit and airports must remain operational during capital projects, so project phasing is crucial in new construction, expansions, or adaptive-reuse projects. The CCS difference is our upfront planning to minimize change orders.

And CCS can create an operational plan to address shortages or delays in the availability of labor or materials. Furthermore, we have experts in the latest methodologies including LEAN and Agile that we can apply to optimize resources and maximize value throughout the process.

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Maximizing value

CCS shepherds transportation, air, and infrastructure projects from beginning to end. We validate estimates against contractor costs. We value engineers throughout the design and construction process to give institutions and organizations the most for their dollar.

We look at long-term value and perform life cycle analysis which may justify investing in lasting materials and finishes that deliver a better user experience.

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Information sharing

We’re expert communicators, too. CCS helps clients manage sustainability requirements and ensure they’re getting value from their architect, engineer, and construction management team.

We have experts with the formal certifications, including LEED and Energy Star, required to navigate government regulatory requirements. CCS rebalances information sharing during design and construction and manages monthly reporting. CCS can handle regular reporting from the field for agency review.

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Public engagement

As users and taxpayers, the public demands input, transparency, and clear communication on design, budget, and progress for transportation, air, and infrastructure projects. CCS can manage engagement and information sharing amongst parties throughout the process.

We can present projects to the public and media and report on progress to the appropriate stakeholders along the way. We also perform the necessary due diligence for private/public joint ventures.

CCS is committed to staying current on all the developments and dialogues that are affecting this sector. This is critical so that we raise any issues that may affect a project’s design or cost in a timely manner so that both the Owner & Architect/Engineering teams are able to effectively respond.

Aviation, Transporation and Infrastructure sector background & challenges

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  • There is no question that the roads, bridges, tracks, and skies that convey our nation are a central focus for the new administration. The American Jobs Plan calls for $2 trillion in infrastructure spending:

    • $25 billion in airports
    • $100 billion to build and upgrade public schools
    • $12 billion for community college construction
    • $18 billion to modernize Veterans Affairs hospitals and clinics
    • $10 billion to modernize federal buildings

    Infrastructure investment has gone from populist political promise to funded reality at the federal level. Agencies at all levels will race to unlock financing and take delayed projects off the shelf. Bridges, roads, and parking structures in need of maintenance will be prime targets, but funds for projects that anticipate the next half-century will be required — electric bus maintenance and charging facilities, for instance.

  • With lower ridership over the last two years, public transit agencies across the nation took the opportunity to invest in maintenance. As we enter the reopening period, ridership is gradually returning as are funds. Many agencies will invest in multi-modal systems which connect transit, e-scooter, and bike-sharing with pedestrians, cyclists, and e-bike users and recognize the changing shape of commuting in light of remote and hybrid work.

    Airport usage and investment took a dip, but will gradually increase. Airports are pivoting to becoming destinations of their own, offering travelers more amenities in comfortable spaces to support the bottom line, and, behind the scenes, acting as logistics hubs for next-day global goods distribution. Increased health and safety protocols and social distancing may be temporary, but touchless tech and security will gradually redefine the air journey, along with the increasing shift to alternative energy and even smaller airports, closer to where people live.

There is no question that the roads, bridges, tracks, and skies that convey our nation are a central focus for the new administration. The American Jobs Plan calls for $2 trillion in infrastructure spending:

  • $25 billion in airports
  • $100 billion to build and upgrade public schools
  • $12 billion for community college construction
  • $18 billion to modernize Veterans Affairs hospitals and clinics
  • $10 billion to modernize federal buildings

Infrastructure investment has gone from populist political promise to funded reality at the federal level. Agencies at all levels will race to unlock financing and take delayed projects off the shelf. Bridges, roads, and parking structures in need of maintenance will be prime targets, but funds for projects that anticipate the next half-century will be required — electric bus maintenance and charging facilities, for instance.

With lower ridership over the last two years, public transit agencies across the nation took the opportunity to invest in maintenance. As we enter the reopening period, ridership is gradually returning as are funds. Many agencies will invest in multi-modal systems which connect transit, e-scooter, and bike-sharing with pedestrians, cyclists, and e-bike users and recognize the changing shape of commuting in light of remote and hybrid work.

Airport usage and investment took a dip, but will gradually increase. Airports are pivoting to becoming destinations of their own, offering travelers more amenities in comfortable spaces to support the bottom line, and, behind the scenes, acting as logistics hubs for next-day global goods distribution. Increased health and safety protocols and social distancing may be temporary, but touchless tech and security will gradually redefine the air journey, along with the increasing shift to alternative energy and even smaller airports, closer to where people live.