Classical Theatre
Sectors

Cultural Institutions

CCS works with cultural institutions of all scales and types to help them fulfill their needs in the built environment, including theaters, museums, and performing arts centers.

In the arts, the quality of space is essential to the experience. We work directly with institutions, architects, and engineers to make sure our cultural clients get the beautiful, functional venues and offices they deserve.

We support our clients with technical expertise and functions while assembling the right team for design and construction. We’re experts in validating the design and budget forecasting. We help cultural clients get the most out of their investment dollars while ensuring projects stay on track to welcome back audiences on day one. Over the course of this work, CCS keeps stakeholders informed to demonstrate both ongoing and long-term value.

Highlights

  • 97 fine arts museums with an estimated value of $2 billion

  • 91 theaters and performing arts venues with an estimated value of $2.7 billion

  • 41 entertainment projects with an estimated value 
of $5.7 billion

Our process

Certificate, Checkmark, Done, Check

Expertise and optimization

CCS can support cultural institutions with technical expertise and in assembling the right project team. We facilitate construction management and general contractor selection, identify the right subcontractors and consultants, utilizing deep knowledge of the local market from our own team of sector experts who manage every facet of the design and construction process.

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Design and budget validation

Beginning with pre-design, CCS ensures that design for cultural projects is future-proofed to meet the long-term goals of the organization. Our collaborative method includes feasibility studies, design evaluation, review, construction management selection, and accurate total project budgeting.

We assist decision-makers with budget estimates and advise stakeholders on cost and constructability. We help determine the best method of project delivery, drawing on our deep familiarity with the costs, risks, timeline, and contractual aspects of the procurement process.

Geometric, Abstract, Shapes, Circle

Project phasing

Culture venues may need to stay operational, so project phasing is crucial in new construction, expansions, or adaptive-reuse projects. The CCS difference is our upfront planning to minimize change orders.

And CCS can create an operational plan to address shortages or delays in the availability of labor or materials. Furthermore, we have experts in the latest methodologies including LEAN and Agile that we can apply to optimize resources and maximize value throughout the process.

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Maximizing value

CCS shepherds cultural projects from beginning to end. We validate estimates against contractor costs. We value engineers throughout the design and construction process to give institutions and organizations the most for their dollar.

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Information sharing

We’re expert communicators, too. CCS helps clients manage sustainability requirements and ensure they’re getting value from their architect, engineer, and construction management team.

We have experts with the formal certifications, including LEED and Energy Star, required to navigate government regulatory requirements. CCS rebalances information sharing during design and construction and manages monthly reporting. We handle regular reporting from the field for board review while keeping donors in the loop.

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Public engagement

The public is keenly interested in cultural projects. CCS can manage engagement and information sharing amongst parties throughout the process.

We can present projects to the public and media and report on progress to the appropriate stakeholders along the way. We also perform the necessary due diligence for private/public joint ventures.

CCS is committed to staying current on all the developments and dialogues that are affecting the cultural institutions sector. This is critical so that we raise any issues that may affect a project’s design or cost in a timely manner so that both the Owner & Architect/Engineering teams are able to effectively respond.

Cultural Institutions sector background & challenges

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  • There’s no getting around it, cultural institutions were hit hard these last few years, especially those that heavily rely on the revenue from ticket sales for live performances, exhibitions, and events. Many such organizations, such as local independent theater companies, have revised their programming, while stimulus funds have been a lifeline to others. Those that remain are diversifying their offerings to include ticketed virtual events and streaming performances, while developing new sources of revenue, and tapping into their valuable databases of patrons and supporters.

  • Cultural organizations will emerge more proactive and competitive. For a lucky some, the downtime has been an opportunity to reinvest, to renovate theaters, galleries and performance spaces. Many are anticipating even greater traffic and revenue when they fully reopen. Investors in the culture space have been snapping up empty venues and warehouses in American downtowns. Why? After a time of social isolation, pent-up demand for cultural experiences (live music, gallery exhibitions, theater, etc.) outside the home where arts lovers can gather is massive. It’s not far fetched to expect that we may see a boomerang effect — with cultural gatherings, the arts and civic programming roaring back to life.

  • Drawing from the lessons of the shutdown, cultural institutions are now facing mandates to cultivate new patrons and donors during the year of reopening. They are increasingly using data analytics and sophisticated outreach strategies to build a base of support that can sustain them through the next crisis.

    In addition, artistic directors are on a mission to get the programming and curation mix right during this anything-but-ordinary time. There’s no lack of subject matter. Creative offerings will respond to intense and ongoing national conversations. Inevitably, the arts will serve up both food for thought and comfort food, attending to our collective need to feel connected to each other and the future of our nation.

There’s no getting around it, cultural institutions were hit hard these last few years, especially those that heavily rely on the revenue from ticket sales for live performances, exhibitions, and events. Many such organizations, such as local independent theater companies, have revised their programming, while stimulus funds have been a lifeline to others. Those that remain are diversifying their offerings to include ticketed virtual events and streaming performances, while developing new sources of revenue, and tapping into their valuable databases of patrons and supporters.

Cultural organizations will emerge more proactive and competitive. For a lucky some, the downtime has been an opportunity to reinvest, to renovate theaters, galleries and performance spaces. Many are anticipating even greater traffic and revenue when they fully reopen. Investors in the culture space have been snapping up empty venues and warehouses in American downtowns. Why? After a time of social isolation, pent-up demand for cultural experiences (live music, gallery exhibitions, theater, etc.) outside the home where arts lovers can gather is massive. It’s not far fetched to expect that we may see a boomerang effect — with cultural gatherings, the arts and civic programming roaring back to life.

Drawing from the lessons of the shutdown, cultural institutions are now facing mandates to cultivate new patrons and donors during the year of reopening. They are increasingly using data analytics and sophisticated outreach strategies to build a base of support that can sustain them through the next crisis.

In addition, artistic directors are on a mission to get the programming and curation mix right during this anything-but-ordinary time. There’s no lack of subject matter. Creative offerings will respond to intense and ongoing national conversations. Inevitably, the arts will serve up both food for thought and comfort food, attending to our collective need to feel connected to each other and the future of our nation.