unsplash_PhYq704ffdA (4)
Sectors

Parks & Recreation

Play is serious business and getting recreation space right the first time takes expertise.

We work directly with consultants, planners, architects, and engineers to make sure our parks and recreation clients get extraordinary public spaces.

We support our clients with technical expertise and functions while assembling the right team for design and construction. We’re experts in validating the design and budget forecasting. We help recreation clients get the most out of their investment dollars while ensuring projects stay on track to welcome the public on day one. Over the course of this work, CCS keeps stakeholders informed to demonstrate both ongoing and long-term value.

Highlights

  • 133 Sports and recreation projects with an estimated value of $5.4 billion

  • 57 stadiums with an estimated value of $4.7 billion

  • 174 outdoor parks with an estimated value of $2.6 billion

  • Numerous adaptive reuse, rails to trails, parks, administration buildings, master planning, and new construction projects for park districts across the nation

Our process

Certificate, Checkmark, Done, Check

Expertise and optimization

CCS can support parks and recreation departments with technical expertise and in assembling the right project team. We facilitate construction management and general contractor selection and identify the right subcontractors and consultants. We do this by utilizing deep knowledge of the local market, bringing our own team of knowledgeable experts to every facet of the design and construction process.

document-calculator

Design and budget validation

Beginning with pre-design, CCS ensures that design for parks and recreation projects are future-proofed to meet the long-term goals of the organization and the community. We can provide consulting services on master plans for parks and recreation facilities. Our collaborative method includes feasibility studies, design evaluation, review, construction management selection, and accurate total project budgeting.

We can assist decision-makers with budget estimates and advise stakeholders on cost and constructability. We help determine the best method of project delivery, drawing on our deep familiarity with the costs, risks, timeline, and contractual aspects of the procurement process.

Geometric, Abstract, Shapes, Circle

Project phasing

Parks and recreation venues remain critical to the life of a community during capital projects, so project phasing is crucial in new construction, expansions, or adaptive-reuse projects. The CCS difference is our upfront planning to minimize change orders.

And CCS can create an operational plan to address shortages or delays in the availability of labor or materials. Furthermore, we have experts in the latest methodologies including LEAN and Agile we can deploy to optimize resources and maximize value throughout the process.

coins-percent-arrow-up

Maximizing value

CCS shepherds parks and recreation projects from beginning to end. We validate estimates against contractor costs. We value engineers throughout the design and construction process to give institutions and organizations the most for their dollar.

For example, we may explore options for alternate materials and finishes in order to improve user experience, life cycle costs, and long-term return on investment.

file-blank-exchange

Information sharing

We’re expert communicators, too. CCS helps clients manage sustainability requirements and ensure they’re getting value from their architect, engineer, and construction management team. We have experts with the formal certifications, including LEED and Energy Star, required to navigate government requirements. CCS has also consulted on Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES) certified projects such as Chicago’s Navy Pier Pierscape.

CCS rebalances information sharing during design and construction and manages monthly reporting. CCS can handle regular reporting from the field for board review while keeping donors in the loop.

employees-presentation

Public engagement

The public is passionate users deeply invested in the quality of parks and recreation spaces. They deserve input, transparency, and clear communication during the design, budget, and building phases.

CCS can manage engagement and information sharing amongst parties throughout the process. We can present projects to the public and media and report on progress to the appropriate stakeholders along the way. We also perform necessary due diligence for private/public joint ventures.

CCS is committed to staying current on all the developments and dialogues that are affecting the parks and rec sector. This is critical so that we raise any issues that may affect a project’s design or cost in a timely manner so that both the Owner & Architect/Engineering teams are able to effectively respond.

Parks & Recreation sector background & challenges

unsplash_BBHIPz-gPXs (7)
unsplash_BBHIPz-gPXs (8)
unsplash_BBHIPz-gPXs (9)
unsplash_BBHIPz-gPXs (10)
  • During the last cycle, parks and recreation facilities emerged as important public spaces that provided safe, socially-distanced destinations for Americans seeking social interaction, mental health, exercise, and comfort. However, a boom in attendance has strained facilities. As the general economy, states saw their tax revenues constrained. Federal aid, however, has allowed many to invest in their parks for summer high season and beyond and to tackle their maintenance backlogs.

  • Recently, politicians in Europe and North America have started a dialogue around the new-urbanism concept of the “15-minute neighborhood” — a space where all residents live within a short walk of a good school, rapid transit, a place to buy fresh food, and a park. Big cities are looking for opportunities to reclaim space in dense residential areas and create small linear and pocket parks or community gardens in order to mitigate heat island effects and enhance the quality of life. Increasingly, we may see big box stores and malls in suburbs and beyond repurposed for indoor recreation uses such as skateparks, farmer’s markets, and pickleball courts. The rails-to-trails trend will continue; meantime, communities will look to seamlessly connect bike trails and dedicated bike lanes for commuting and recreation.

  • Planners increasingly recognize the value of parks for resiliency. In an era of extreme weather events, park landscapes can help protect against flooding, hold and filter stormwater, produce shade, reduce heat island effects, and promote community spirit and connection. They can also serve another purpose — climate education.

  • Indoor recreation facilities will look to touchless technology, controlled capacity and health and safety protocols to promote wellness. Meanwhile, parks systems will look to technology (including drones) to automate cleaning, maintenance, security and landscaping with an eye to controlling operational budgets.

During the last cycle, parks and recreation facilities emerged as important public spaces that provided safe, socially-distanced destinations for Americans seeking social interaction, mental health, exercise, and comfort. However, a boom in attendance has strained facilities. As the general economy, states saw their tax revenues constrained. Federal aid, however, has allowed many to invest in their parks for summer high season and beyond and to tackle their maintenance backlogs.

Recently, politicians in Europe and North America have started a dialogue around the new-urbanism concept of the “15-minute neighborhood” — a space where all residents live within a short walk of a good school, rapid transit, a place to buy fresh food, and a park. Big cities are looking for opportunities to reclaim space in dense residential areas and create small linear and pocket parks or community gardens in order to mitigate heat island effects and enhance the quality of life. Increasingly, we may see big box stores and malls in suburbs and beyond repurposed for indoor recreation uses such as skateparks, farmer’s markets, and pickleball courts. The rails-to-trails trend will continue; meantime, communities will look to seamlessly connect bike trails and dedicated bike lanes for commuting and recreation.

Planners increasingly recognize the value of parks for resiliency. In an era of extreme weather events, park landscapes can help protect against flooding, hold and filter stormwater, produce shade, reduce heat island effects, and promote community spirit and connection. They can also serve another purpose — climate education.

Indoor recreation facilities will look to touchless technology, controlled capacity and health and safety protocols to promote wellness. Meanwhile, parks systems will look to technology (including drones) to automate cleaning, maintenance, security and landscaping with an eye to controlling operational budgets.