unsplash_PhYq704ffdA1
Sectors

Public/Private Housing

Public/Private Housing

We work directly with consultants, planners, architects, and engineers to make sure our residential clients get the very best results that meet consumer demand and result in lasting, quality places to live.

We support our clients with technical expertise and functions while assembling the right team for design and construction. We’re experts in validating the design and budget forecasting. We help our developer and public housing agency clients get the most out of their investment dollars while ensuring projects stay on track to welcome residents on day one. Over the course of this work, CCS keeps stakeholders, including public agencies, informed to demonstrate both ongoing and long-term value.

Highlights

  • 181 public housing projects with an estimated value of $2 billion

  • 118 projects for the Chicago Housing Authority

  • 17 single-family home projects with an estimated value of $32.6 million

  • 129 multifamily housing projects with an estimated value of $6.9 billion

  • 125 senior environments with an estimated value of $1.7 billion

Our process

Certificate, Checkmark, Done, Check

Expertise and optimization

CCS can support residential clients and developers with technical expertise and in assembling the right project team. We facilitate construction management and general contractor selection, identify the right subcontractors and consultants, utilizing deep knowledge of the local market through our own team of knowledgeable experts in every facet of the design and construction process.

document-calculator

Design and budget validation

Beginning with pre-design, CCS ensures that designs for residential projects are future-proofed to meet the long-term goals of the stakeholders and the community. Our collaborative method includes feasibility studies, design evaluation, review, construction management selection, and accurate total project budgeting.

We can assist decision-makers with budget estimates and advise stakeholders on cost and constructability. We help determine the best method of project delivery, drawing on our deep familiarity with the costs, risks, timeline, and contractual aspects of the procurement process.

Geometric, Abstract, Shapes, Circle

Project phasing

Residential projects are sometimes located on dense urban sites or in areas that must stay open, so project phasing is crucial in new construction, expansions, or adaptive-reuse projects.

Our dynamic phasing methodology takes into account multiple variables ranging from the impacts to occupants, users, and neighbors; life safety issues; and meeting the parameters of budget and schedule. This may also involve phasing work concurrently or consecutively to coordinate with supply-chain considerations like materials and labor lead times. Our upfront planning also succeeds in minimizing change orders. And CCS can create an operational plan to address shortages or delays in the availability of labor or materials. Furthermore, we have experts in the latest methodologies including LEAN and agile which we can apply to optimize resources and maximize value throughout the process.

coins-percent-arrow-up

Maximizing value

CCS shepherds residential projects from beginning to end. We validate estimates against contractor costs. We value engineers throughout the design and construction process to give owners and occupants the most for their dollars. Our experts think long-term.

We look at overall value, payback on investment and perform life cycle analysis which may, for example, justify investing in lasting materials and finishes that deliver a better user experience.

file-blank-exchange

Information sharing

We’re expert communicators, too. CCS helps clients manage sustainability requirements and ensure they’re getting value from their architect, engineer, and construction management team.

We have experts with the formal certifications, including LEED and Energy Star, required to navigate government regulatory requirements. CCS rebalances information sharing during design and construction and manages monthly reporting. CCS can also handle regular reporting from the field for stakeholder review.

employees-presentation

Public engagement

New residential projects are highly scrutinized by the public. They require input, transparency, and clear communication on design, budget, and progress. CCS can manage engagement and information sharing amongst parties throughout the process.

We can present projects to the public and media and report on progress to the appropriate stakeholders along the way. We also perform necessary due diligence for private/public joint ventures.

CCS is committed to staying current on all the developments and dialogues that are affecting the housing sector. This is critical so that we raise any issues that may affect a project’s design or cost in a timely manner so that both the Owner & Architect/Engineering teams are able to effectively respond.

Public/Private Housing sector background & challenges

unsplash_BBHIPz-gPX1s
unsplash_BBHIPz-gPXs (19)
unsplash_BBHIPz-gPXs (20)
unsplash_BBHIPz-gPXs (21)
  • The ballooning cost of housing had already led to an exodus from many Americans cities. Many city-dwelling professionals relocated to smaller cities, regional hubs and suburbs to get more space for their money. And yet, many younger professionals still choose big cities for the lifestyle and culture. City planners, developers and architects continue to look for creative solutions to meet market demand for affordable and equitable housing. Even the smaller cities and suburbs are poised to experience the growing pains of congestion, shortages of space and rising prices. In response, planners and developers are eyeing shuttered retail and mall space for repurposing or replacement. In addition, low-vacancy downtown office buildings are becoming ideal candidates for residential conversion.

  • In the 1960s, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development funded thirteen model city projects under the Urban Growth and New Community Development Act. Today, we are witnessing a similar push towards public housing and mixed-use projects that combine market rate and subsidized units with all the desirable features city dwellers love, replacing aging mid-century housing projects. The master plans call for connecting these projects with on-site social services and co-locating small businesses to generate revenues and employment.

  • Planners and developers are looking at TOD (transit-oriented development) to leverage available units in new buildings near public transit, while easing parking requirements. In the most expensive cities, developers are looking to micro-housing with smaller units and more shared amenities to meet demand. The sprawling cities of the West with costly single family homes may welcome innovations in “missing middle” housing (townhouses, accessory dwelling units, etc.) and prefabrication. Modular design and construction techniques offer potential for affordability without losing quality and seem certain to go mainstream. Studies suggest the U.S. will need to build millions more housing units over the next decade to meet the demand for home ownership, a key facet of the American dream.

  • Technology is changing what residents expect in their homes. Demand is surging for home offices, home gyms, space for telehealth consultation, as well as more access to outdoor space, while voice-activated home security and other smart home features are becoming standard. The smart tech will blend with in-demand sustainable features (efficient HVAC, passive heating and cooling, renewable materials) in homes that favor natural light and ventilation.

    Wired tech will also allow for more seniors to age in the places they live, accessing care through telehealth and remote health data monitoring. Retiring baby boomers will enliven niches for both multifamily living and the senior living market. The active adult market is growing and will look to blend social, lifestyle amenities and privacy with affordability and a continuum for aging. As a result of lessons learned, skilled nursing facilities will be upgraded with more outdoor access for residents and the ability to isolate certain residents from others comfortably.

The ballooning cost of housing had already led to an exodus from many Americans cities. Many city-dwelling professionals relocated to smaller cities, regional hubs and suburbs to get more space for their money. And yet, many younger professionals still choose big cities for the lifestyle and culture. City planners, developers and architects continue to look for creative solutions to meet market demand for affordable and equitable housing. Even the smaller cities and suburbs are poised to experience the growing pains of congestion, shortages of space and rising prices. In response, planners and developers are eyeing shuttered retail and mall space for repurposing or replacement. In addition, low-vacancy downtown office buildings are becoming ideal candidates for residential conversion.

In the 1960s, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development funded thirteen model city projects under the Urban Growth and New Community Development Act. Today, we are witnessing a similar push towards public housing and mixed-use projects that combine market rate and subsidized units with all the desirable features city dwellers love, replacing aging mid-century housing projects. The master plans call for connecting these projects with on-site social services and co-locating small businesses to generate revenues and employment.

Planners and developers are looking at TOD (transit-oriented development) to leverage available units in new buildings near public transit, while easing parking requirements. In the most expensive cities, developers are looking to micro-housing with smaller units and more shared amenities to meet demand. The sprawling cities of the West with costly single family homes may welcome innovations in “missing middle” housing (townhouses, accessory dwelling units, etc.) and prefabrication. Modular design and construction techniques offer potential for affordability without losing quality and seem certain to go mainstream. Studies suggest the U.S. will need to build millions more housing units over the next decade to meet the demand for home ownership, a key facet of the American dream.

Technology is changing what residents expect in their homes. Demand is surging for home offices, home gyms, space for telehealth consultation, as well as more access to outdoor space, while voice-activated home security and other smart home features are becoming standard. The smart tech will blend with in-demand sustainable features (efficient HVAC, passive heating and cooling, renewable materials) in homes that favor natural light and ventilation.

Wired tech will also allow for more seniors to age in the places they live, accessing care through telehealth and remote health data monitoring. Retiring baby boomers will enliven niches for both multifamily living and the senior living market. The active adult market is growing and will look to blend social, lifestyle amenities and privacy with affordability and a continuum for aging. As a result of lessons learned, skilled nursing facilities will be upgraded with more outdoor access for residents and the ability to isolate certain residents from others comfortably.

Client Feedback

  • I would like to take the time to thank you and the staff of CCS for the excellent Owner Representative services provided to Villa St. Benedict during the construction phase of our new faith-based retirement community. CCS’ involvement helped us maintain harmony with our existing residents while enduring the many disruptions of construction. Their commitment throughout the project was very apparent and it was this commitment that has maintained this project on budget and schedule.

    Glenn Trembley, CEO/Administrator

    Villa St. Benedict