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Sectors

Corporate/Private

CCS provides commercial real estate developers with a lean process and the right resources and experts to support a project’s successful delivery.

We facilitate construction management and general contractor selection, identify the right subcontractors and consultants, and utilize deep knowledge of the local market with skilled professionals in every facet of the design and construction process.

Highlights

  • 300 corporate/private projects with an estimated value of $4.1 billion

  • 52 mixed-use facilities with an estimated value of $10 billion

  • 171 corporate office buildings with an estimated value of $6.6 billion

  • 92 retail projects with an estimated value of $5.3 billion

  • 43 industrial facilities with an estimated value of $753 million

Our process

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Design and budget validation

Beginning with pre-design, CCS helps assess risk, strategize to achieve timely delivery which impacts everything from a building’s underwriting to its leasing strategy and ultimately its value and cap rate. Our experts ensure that designs for commercial projects are future-proofed to stave off obsolescence and meet the long-term goals of the developer and its target market. Our collaborative method includes feasibility studies, design evaluation, review, construction management selection, and accurate total project budgeting. We assist decision-makers with budget estimates and advise stakeholders on cost and constructability. We help determine the best method of project delivery, drawing on our deep familiarity with the costs, risks, timeline, and contractual aspects of the procurement process.

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Project phasing

Many commercial properties and the surrounding uses must remain operational during a construction process, so project phasing is crucial in new construction, expansions, or adaptive reuse. In the case of mixed-use projects and vertical subdivisions, this may mean different delivery dates for various spaces. The CCS difference is our upfront planning to minimize change orders.

And CCS can create an operational plan to address shortages or delays in the availability of labor or materials. Furthermore, we have experts in the latest methodologies including LEAN and Agile that we can apply to optimize resources and maximize value throughout the process.

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Maximizing value

CCS shepherds commercial projects from beginning to end. We validate estimates against contractor costs. We value engineers throughout the design and construction process to give owners and organizations the most for their dollar. CCS can provide an unbiased alternative source of oversight and review on commercial projects to counterbalance that of construction management and contractors.

In some cases, this means evaluating and revising options for materials and finishes because they improve user experience, life cycle costs, and the long-term value of the asset and return on investment.

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Information sharing

We’re expert communicators, too. CCS helps clients manage sustainability requirements and ensure they’re getting value from their architect, engineer, and construction management team. We can establish project protocols and internal communication flows that align with our client’s culture and practices.

We have experts with the formal certifications, including LEED and Energy Star, required to navigate permitting requirements. CCS rebalances information sharing during design and construction and manages monthly reporting. CCS can handle regular reporting from the field for executive review.

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Public engagement

Commercial projects operate within a political, economic, and social context and must generate goodwill and support in order to succeed. CCS has experience with ensuring clear communication on design, budget, and progress for high-profile commercial projects while maintaining security. CCS can manage engagement and information sharing amongst parties throughout the process.

When appropriate, we can present projects to the public and media and report on progress to the appropriate stakeholders along the way. Managing the optics of the project become crucial during the lease-up and sale of an asset because they provide certainty that an asset will be delivered on time and meet the highest standards of construction and operations.

CCS is committed to staying current on all the developments and dialogues that are affecting the corporate sector. This is critical so that we raise any issues that may affect a project’s design or cost in a timely manner so that both the Owner & Architect/Engineering teams are able to effectively respond.

Corporate/Private sector background & challenges

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  • The private sector was affected by changing work and life patterns which affected occupancies in the workplace, hospitality, and entertainment venues, among many product types. With the sector on the comeback, it will look very different in the future.

    One of the biggest shifts is the migration of work to online spaces. In 2021, Zoom had 467,100 business customers. The number of annual meeting minutes on Zoom is now over 3.3 trillion with 45 billion minutes of webinars hosted every year. Clearly, it’s meant that work is adopting a hybrid model — focused, private work taking place increasingly at home and collaborative work still needing office space.

    While stay-at-home orders hit brick-and-mortar retail outlets, big boxes offering essentials did well. At the same time, big box stores are introducing small-format stores which are more competitive with online sites and are valuable in dense, urban areas with a scarcity of land. At the same time, online sales need space, too. At the same time, online sales needs space, too. Ecommerce had a banner 2021, rocketing up to $871 billion, despite severe supply chain disruption.

  • Retail outlets are in the midst of a pivot from places that displayed, stocked, and sold lots of goods (the old department store model), to cool places that offer an Instagrammable experience, showcase a brand, its lifestyle, and values. In this new model, you can even make the purchase later, at home. Behind the scenes, the logistics of overnight delivery ramped up to meet demand. Distribution centers and warehouses are getting smaller because they needn’t hold goods for long, but they’re going to be more numerous and increasingly sprinkled amidst population centers.

  • Employers have adjusted their future needs for space, with some moving from larger centralized hubs in favor of distributed flexible spaces. For many, the last few years showed us just how important face-to-face human interaction is for the health of organizations. The new office will increasingly accommodate hybrid options where staff can work where they like but have space to collaborate, meet with, or work in the vicinity of others as needed. The flexible office space market is likely to grow as well.

  • Properties that can adjust to changing needs — such as offices that can expand or contract their collaboration space — will be attractive. Smart buildings, with automated systems for access, climate, and lighting control are now standard. Air filtration and HVAC controls, ultraviolet (UV) lighting modifications, touch-free bathrooms, and sign-in kiosks for visitors with mobile integration, have migrated from the “nice to have” to the “must-have”. In the near future, owners will seek buildings that interface with data sensors and share that data with sophisticated property management systems. These data-rich buildings will be essential for owners and operators who want to refine space planning and programming, protect health and safety and save on operational costs.

The private sector was affected by changing work and life patterns which affected occupancies in the workplace, hospitality, and entertainment venues, among many product types. With the sector on the comeback, it will look very different in the future.

One of the biggest shifts is the migration of work to online spaces. In 2021, Zoom had 467,100 business customers. The number of annual meeting minutes on Zoom is now over 3.3 trillion with 45 billion minutes of webinars hosted every year. Clearly, it’s meant that work is adopting a hybrid model — focused, private work taking place increasingly at home and collaborative work still needing office space.

While stay-at-home orders hit brick-and-mortar retail outlets, big boxes offering essentials did well. At the same time, big box stores are introducing small-format stores which are more competitive with online sites and are valuable in dense, urban areas with a scarcity of land. At the same time, online sales need space, too. At the same time, online sales needs space, too. Ecommerce had a banner 2021, rocketing up to $871 billion, despite severe supply chain disruption.

Retail outlets are in the midst of a pivot from places that displayed, stocked, and sold lots of goods (the old department store model), to cool places that offer an Instagrammable experience, showcase a brand, its lifestyle, and values. In this new model, you can even make the purchase later, at home. Behind the scenes, the logistics of overnight delivery ramped up to meet demand. Distribution centers and warehouses are getting smaller because they needn’t hold goods for long, but they’re going to be more numerous and increasingly sprinkled amidst population centers.

Employers have adjusted their future needs for space, with some moving from larger centralized hubs in favor of distributed flexible spaces. For many, the last few years showed us just how important face-to-face human interaction is for the health of organizations. The new office will increasingly accommodate hybrid options where staff can work where they like but have space to collaborate, meet with, or work in the vicinity of others as needed. The flexible office space market is likely to grow as well.

Properties that can adjust to changing needs — such as offices that can expand or contract their collaboration space — will be attractive. Smart buildings, with automated systems for access, climate, and lighting control are now standard. Air filtration and HVAC controls, ultraviolet (UV) lighting modifications, touch-free bathrooms, and sign-in kiosks for visitors with mobile integration, have migrated from the “nice to have” to the “must-have”. In the near future, owners will seek buildings that interface with data sensors and share that data with sophisticated property management systems. These data-rich buildings will be essential for owners and operators who want to refine space planning and programming, protect health and safety and save on operational costs.